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Studies solve mystery of 'HIV-Negative AIDS'

Sixty people who had claimed they were suffering from a mysterious infectious condition dubbed "HIV-Negative AIDS" have been cleared of the disease, but 48 of them tested positive for several types of pathogens.

Published
09 May 2011
From
AsiaOne
How TRIM5 fights HIV

Thanks to a certain protein, rhesus monkeys are resistant to HIV. Known as TRIM5, the protein prevents the HI virus from multiplying once it has entered the cell. Researchers from the universities of Geneva and Zurich have now discovered the protein's mechanism, as they report in Nature. This also opens up new prospects for fighting HIV in humans.

Published
20 April 2011
From
Eurekalert HIV
China: Fake AIDS panic shows HIV ignorance

Twenty-six-year-old Jiang visited a prostitute last July. Unexpectedly, he had a condom breakage during sex. He fell ill the next day. He believed that he had been infected with HIV.

Published
12 April 2011
From
Global Times
Tumor suppressor blocks viral growth in natural HIV controllers

Elevated levels of p21, a protein best known as a cancer fighter, may be involved in the ability of a few individuals to control HIV infection with their immune system alone.

Published
14 March 2011
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Pushing HIV out the door: How host factors aid in the release of HIV particles

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat in Munich researchers, together with colleagues at Heidelberg University Hospital and McGill University, have shown how host enzymes contribute to the release of HIV particles from infected cells. With the aid of their new microscopy technique, they now aim to analyze the entire life cycle of the virus in unprecedented detail.

Published
11 March 2011
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Malaria Drug Plaquenil Calms Immune Activation

Plaquenil (hydrochloroquine), a drug used to treat malaria, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, was able to significantly reduce immune activation in a small group of HIV-positive people.

Published
09 March 2011
From
AIDSMeds
NIH-funded study shows early brain effects of HIV in mouse model

A new mouse model closely resembles how the human body reacts to early HIV infection and is shedding light on nerve cell damage related to the disease, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Published
02 March 2011
From
EurekAlert
HIV makes protein that may help virus's resurgence

New research enhances the current knowledge of how human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), which causes AIDS, controls the cell cycle of cells that it infects. The new findings may shed light on how the virus reactivates after entering a dormant phase.

Published
25 February 2011
From
Eurekalert
Most detailed 3D-model of HIV ever made

Ivan Konstantinov and his team from Visual Science have created the most-detailed 3D model of the virus to date.

Published
17 February 2011
From
New Scientist
'Sleepy' immune system might fight HIV

A Manitoba AIDS scientist, who has spent 25 years trying to unlock the mystery of HIV-resistant sex workers in Kenya, says a reduced immune system might actually be the best defence against the disease.

Published
16 February 2011
From
CBC News

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.