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Math may help calculate way to find new drugs for HIV and other diseases

Using mathematical concepts, Princeton researchers have developed a method of discovering new drugs for a range of diseases by calculating which physical properties of biological molecules may predict their effectiveness as medicines.

Published
07 February 2011
From
Princeton
Immune system boost cures HIV mice

A group of Australian scientists have been able to cure HIV in mice by boosting their immune systems. Doctor Marc Pellegrini from Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute found a hormone known as Interleukin 7 stimulates the body's response to an

Published
04 February 2011
From
ABC
HIV's trickery within the macrophage revealed

HIV adapts in a surprising way to survive and thrive in its hiding spot within the human immune system, scientists have learned. The the finding helps explain why HIV remains such a formidable foe after three decades of research, and it offers scientists a new, unexpected way to try to stop the virus.

Published
23 January 2011
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Immune paradox

Why is it that some HIV patients treated with antiretrovirals end up suffering from a new immunopathology? Martyn French is trying to solve this puzzling conundrum.

Published
10 January 2011
From
Australian Life Scientist
UCSF team finds new source of immune cells during pregnancy

UCSF researchers have shown for the first time that the human fetal immune system arises from an entirely different source than the adult immune system, and is more likely to tolerate than fight foreign substances in its environment.

Published
16 December 2010
From
UCSF
Discordant HIV Levels in the Brain and Blood Are More Common Than Expected

Up to 10 percent of people on antiretroviral therapy have active HIV replication in the brain and spinal fluid despite having undetectable HIV levels in the blood, according to a new study.

Published
16 November 2010
From
AIDSMeds
X-rays illuminate the mechanism used by HIV to attack human DNA

Scientists from Imperial College London have used data collected at Diamond Light Source, the UK’s national synchrotron facility, to advance the understanding of how HIV and other retroviruses infect human or animal cells.

Published
11 November 2010
From
Imperial College London
Scientists reveal HIV cell mystery

Australian scientists have discovered how HIV enters `resting cells`. The discovery could pave the way for identifying drugs that could block HIV entry into resting ceklls, bring a cure for HIV infection one step closer.

Published
21 September 2010
From
The Age
Precursor to HIV was in monkeys for millennia

In a discovery that sheds new light on the history of AIDS scientists have found evidence that the ancestor to the virus that causes the disease has been in monkeys and apes for at least 32,000 years — not just a few hundred years, as had been previously thought.

Published
17 September 2010
From
New York Times
AIDS virus lineage much older than previously thought

An ancestor of HIV that infects monkeys is thousands of years older than previously thought, suggesting that HIV, which causes AIDS, is not likely to stop killing humans anytime soon, finds a study by University of Arizona and Tulane University researchers.

Published
16 September 2010
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.