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Long-acting HIV treatment news

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IV and Injectable HIV Treatments Are Much Discussed -- But Won't Be Here Anytime Soon

Given the success of currently available oral therapies -- in which essentially 100% of people who take it are virologically suppressed -- why do so many people say they want injectable shots instead?

Published
21 January 2016
From
TheBody Pro
Janssen, ViiV Healthcare Formalize Injectable Rilpivirine + Cabotegravir Phase 3 as HIV Treatment

Janssen Sciences Ireland UC (Janssen), formalized its collaboration with ViiV Healthcare on phase III development and commercialization of a two drug regimen of two long acting, all-injectable formulations of rilpivirine (a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor by Janssen) and cabotegravir (ViiV Healthcare).

Published
08 January 2016
From
Street Insider
Long-acting injectable HIV treatment shows promise in early study results

A future of HIV treatment that doesn’t depend on daily dosing seemed to move a little closer today with an announcement that early findings show an injected combination of two antiretroviral medicines given monthly or every two months effective in controlling HIV among people whose virus was already suppressed.

Published
04 November 2015
From
Science Speaks
Drug-level study shows feasibility of long-acting integrase inhibitor cabotegravir

A pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis presented at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy this week in Washington, DC, confirmed that the long-acting HIV integrase inhibitor cabotegravir (formerly GSK1265744) reaches adequate target levels in the blood, setting the stage for efficacy trials for HIV treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

Published
10 September 2014
From
HIVand hepatitis.com
Long-acting HIV drugs advanced to overcome adherence challenge

If it proves effective, long-acting antiretroviral therapy would set up a new paradigm of monthly or quarterly injectable therapy for some patients. Long-acting drug formulations could solve one of the thorniest problems in HIV management - adherence.

Published
08 April 2014
From
Nature Medicine
Long-Acting HIV Antiretrovirals May Be Revolutionary. But Will They Be Worth It?

Once-a-month HIV antiretroviral dosing is no longer a fanciful dream. Long-acting antiretrovirals are currently in development, and the first glimpses of early safety/efficacy data are not terribly far away. So it's not outlandish for us to start thinking about where these drugs might fit into the HIV treatment armamentarium once they arrive. But will they be cost-effective?

Published
06 October 2013
From
The Body Pro
Good safety profile with long-acting integrase inhibitor, GSK744

Analysis of eight studies involving 245 people taking oral or injected GSK1265744 confirmed that the long-acting integrase inhibitor is well tolerated and results in few serious lab abnormalities.

Published
19 September 2013
From
NATAP
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.