Making a will

Published: 31 August 2010

Making a will allows someone to decide what will happen to everything that belongs to them. They can make sure that their partner, family, friends or charities receive exactly what they wish.

However, they may not have a completely free hand if they have dependents, children, or a current or former spouse or civil partner. It’s possible, for example, for a spouse to later take a claim to a court if they feel that inadequate provision has been made for them. Moreover, under Scottish law, it is not possible for someone to completely disinherit their spouse, civil partner or children; the spouse/civil partner will be entitled to a third and children to another third of the deceased's ‘moveable estate’. The remainder of the estate can be left to whomever the individual wishes.

It’s also worth making a will even if someone has no property to speak of.

By making a will, someone decides who will look after their affairs and take care of the arrangements after their death – see Executors.

If they have children under 18 they may be able to appoint someone to care for them after their death – see Guardians.

They can express any particular wishes they may have about their funeral – for example, they might have a preference for cremation or burial, church service or informal wake.

While legislation in England, Wales and Northern Ireland is broadly similar, Scottish law on this topic is often different.

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.