Number of people reached

The number of people reached by, or recognising, an intervention is a very basic measure of its success, but a high contact rate does not lead automatically to large measurable effects on behaviour or incidence. A project which reaches a relatively small number of people may have a much greater long-term effect on behaviour and incidence, especially if those people are either opinion leaders themselves or the section of a particular community that demonstrates the highest-risk behaviour. Measures of quantity are not very useful unless they are accompanied by measures of quality.

It is also useful to focus on demographic groups, such as women or young people, if research evidence suggests that these groups are at particular risk of HIV infection. For example, there is some evidence that younger injecting drug users are at greatest risk of HIV infection, and it may be appropriate to set targets for contacts with this group as a surrogate or mediator for an effective intervention to reduce HIV transmission amongst injecting drug users.

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.