The CDC reviews of effective interventions

In the USA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducts periodic reviews of HIV and sexual-risk behaviour-change programmes in order to: endorse evidence-based interventions; help the programme developers package them as manuals, course materials and toolkits; and disseminate them for national use.

The first stage is to systematically go through the evidence of efficacy for a particular programme through its Prevention Research Synthesis (PRS) project (see www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/research/prs/evidence-based-interventions.htm). This involves periodically scanning journals for programmes that provide convincingly effective HIV-prevention outcomes. The CDC uses strict criteria for study design, quality of implementation and analysis and strength of evidence.

The CDC last updated its list of interventions in August 2009. At that time, it could identify a total of 41 ‘best evidence’ interventions and 28 ‘promising evidence’ interventions. Twenty-three of these are delivered to individuals; 41 to groups; and five to the wider community.

Programmes for which there is strong evidence of efficacy are then disseminated and packaged via its Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project, a centralised database, training resource and licensing centre of HIV-prevention interventions for which efficacy evidence exists: see www.effectiveinterventions.org.

A 2007 article in the American Journal of Public Health provided information on the review of interventions published between 2000 and 2004.1 An initial 21,039 journal articles were narrowed down to 176 studies that provided relevant outcome data, of which only 18 satisfied the other requirements.

References

  1. Lyles CM et al. Best-evidence interventions: findings from a systematic review of HIV behavioral interventions for U.S. populations at high risk, 2000-2004. Am J Public Health 97(1):133-143, 2007
This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.