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Vaccinations and immunisation

Many childhood illnesses can be avoided through vaccines or immunisations. Most routine vaccines are safe for children living with HIV. It is recommended they should receive the same immunisations as are recommended for all babies born in the UK.

However, some ‘live vaccines’ (where a weakened version of a virus is injected, so that the body builds up an immunity to it) are not considered safe for children with HIV, particularly if the immune system has become weak.

Your child should not have the BCG vaccine for tuberculosis. If your child is due to have a live vaccine, either routine ones like measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) or ones for travel (e.g. yellow fever) you can check with your HIV doctor whether it’s safe to go ahead.

Injected flu vaccines using killed virus are safe for children with HIV. A new nasal spray flu vaccine used for children uses ‘live’ virus, but is considered safe for children with HIV who have a healthy immune system. This is also the case for the ‘live’ rotavirus vaccine, given by mouth to babies at two and three months. This protects against a highly infectious stomach bug that can cause severe diarrhoea. Again, ask your child’s HIV doctor about whether your child should have these vaccinations.

HIV & children

Published March 2015

Last reviewed March 2015

Next review March 2018

Contact NAM to find out more about the scientific research and information used to produce this booklet.

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.