Search through all our worldwide HIV and AIDS news and features, using the topics below to filter your results by subjects including HIV treatment, transmission and prevention, and hepatitis and TB co-infections.

Adherence news

Show

From To
Cigarette smoking may undermine benefits of potent antiretroviral therapy

Cigarette smokers are more likely to be diagnosed with an AIDS-defining condition or to die, negating some of the benefits of potent antiretroviral therapy, according

Published
26 June 2006
By
Edwin J. Bernard
Should patients with high viral loads and high CD4 cell counts start anti-HIV therapy? (corrected)

Analysis of data from a large Canadian study has found that having viral load above 100,000 copies/ml before starting antiretroviral therapy is only associated with

Published
25 May 2006
By
Christopher Gadd
Directly administered antiretroviral therapy benefits drug users with adherence problems

In both resource-limited and wealthy countries, IDUs make up a significant and growing proportion of the HIV-infected population. Some studies have suggested that individuals with

Published
19 May 2006
By
Edwin J. Bernard
Microbicides 2006: Poor adherence reported in some of the microbicide studies

Women randomised to microbicides currently being evaluated in the clinical efficacy studies, described at the Microbicides 2006 Conference recently in Cape Town, report that they

Published
13 May 2006
By
Theo Smart
Accurate timing of drug doses improves response to HIV treatment

HIV-positive patients who take their HIV drugs at the same time every day have a better response to antiretroviral therapy, according to a longitudinal study

Published
25 April 2006
By
Christopher Gadd
HIV-positive people with higher viral load have increased risk of bacterial pneumonia

The incidence of bacterial pneumonia amongst HIV-positive individuals treated with an antiretroviral regimen containing a protease inhibitor is similar to that seen in the general,

Published
24 April 2006
By
Michael Carter
Family support just as good as directly observed therapy for TB treatment, Nepal study finds

Since the 1950s, directly observed therapy has been a tool used to ensure that a person with tuberculosis takes all of the medication needed to

Published
21 March 2006
By
Theo Smart
Co-packaged AZT/3TC/efavirenz regimen approved for use in PEPFAR programmes

The United States' Food and Drug Administration this week granted tentative approval for a co-packaged antiretroviral drug regimen, consisting of lamivudine/zidovudine (AZT/3TC) fixed dose combination

Published
09 March 2006
By
Keith Alcorn
CROI: Do boosted protease inhibitors have a lower risk of treatment failure than other regimens?

Anti-HIV treatment regimens including ritonavir (Norvir)-boosted protease inhibitors may be more forgiving of low adherence than those including unboosted protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase

Published
24 February 2006
By
Christopher Gadd
Clinical and immunological benefits lasting at least three years reported by large Kenyan antiretroviral programme

Despite a number of studies showing that ART can be effective in resource-limited settings, there remain concerns about treatment adherence and how long the drugs

Published
10 January 2006
By
Theo Smart

Filter by country

Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.