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Ageing and HIV news

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Poor lower-limb strength common in patients with long-term HIV infection, French study finds

Over half of middle-aged HIV-positive patients in a large French cohort had poor lower-limb strength, French investigators report in the online edition of AIDS. They warn that

Published
21 March 2011
By
Michael Carter
Aging and HIV: Older HIV-Positive Men Are Frailer Than Similar HIV-Negative Men

HIV-positive men ages 50 and older are more likely to have symptoms of frailty than HIV-negative men of the same age, according to a study presented Monday, February 28, at the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Boston.

Published
07 March 2011
From
AIDSMeds
Decreased limb muscle and increased abdominal fat linked to higher mortality in people with HIV

HIV-positive people who lose muscle mass in their arms and legs whilst gaining abdominal fat have a higher likelihood of death, according to findings from the FRAM

Published
02 March 2011
By
Liz Highleyman
US may pay for sex disease tests for elderly - Reuters

The national health insurance program, which already pays for HIV tests, said on Thursday that it was considering adding the additional STD exams as part of an initiative to cover more preventive care.

Published
24 February 2011
From
Reuters
The Long-Term Survivor Dilemma

With the advent of friendlier drugs and long-term virus suppression, many of us are confronted with a dilemma faced by few healthy people our age. Fear of financial doom in old age has replaced the fear of death that was part of our psyche for so many years.

Published
16 February 2011
From
The Body
The Long and Winding Road: Growing Older with HIV

It is estimated that by 2015, over half of all people living with HIV will be age 50 or older.

Published
12 February 2011
From
Huffington Post
Older people account for majority of San Francisco AIDS cases

For the first time, people 50 years of age or older account for the majority of people living with an AIDS diagnosis in San Francisco. (People with an AIDS diagnosis are those who have ever had a CD4 cell count below 200).

Published
03 February 2011
From
Bay Area Reporter
Older adults often excluded from clinical trials

Older adults are a large and growing patient population but more than half of clinical trials exclude them based on age or age-related conditions, according to a study by the University of Michigan Health. It's a concern because doctors can't be certain clinical trial results apply to their older patients.

Published
02 February 2011
From
EurekAlert
Rapid ageing of T-cells after HIV infection could help explain cancers, diseases of ageing

HIV infection can cause a specific sub-group of CD4 T-cells to age by as much as 20 or 30 years within three years of contracting the virus,

Published
27 January 2011
By
Keith Alcorn
Old habits die hard for ageing drug users

The number of older drug users is rising. But what health and care challenges do they face as they age, and is the system prepared to deal with them?

Published
26 January 2011
From
The Guardian

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.