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Bone and joint problems news

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Low Vitamin D Levels Are Common in Both HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women

Though nearly two thirds of women in a large study had low vitamin D levels—a risk factor for bone and heart problems—the HIV-positive women were actually slightly less likely than HIV-negative women to be vitamin D deficient. 

Published
14 April 2011
From
AIDSMeds
Vitamin D levels linked with health of blood vessels

A lack of vitamin D, even in generally healthy people, is linked with stiffer arteries and an inability of blood vessels to relax, researchers have found.

Published
03 April 2011
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
What Lies Ahead: An Activist's View of Promising HIV Treatment Research

After attending the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011) in Boston, Mass., and following different areas of research, I decided to write down a list of advancements that really thrill and energize me as an educator and research advocate.

Published
31 March 2011
From
The Body
Fracture rates higher in patients with HIV

Fracture rates in patients with HIV are higher than those in the general US population, investigators report in the online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. Rates

Published
15 March 2011
By
Michael Carter
Does immune reconstitution contribute to ART-related bone loss?

Immune recovery and T-cell restoration may play a key role in bone loss that occurs very soon after starting antiretroviral therapy, according to a small study presented

Published
02 March 2011
By
Liz Highleyman
Bone loss a general side-effect of HIV therapy, suggests small study

Increased bone turnover could be a general side-effect of HIV therapy rather than particular classes of drug or individual agents, Swiss investigators report in the online edition

Published
08 February 2011
By
Michael Carter
Vitamin D deficiency increases risk of type 2 diabetes for patients with HIV

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes for patients with HIV, Italian investigators report in the online edition of AIDS. The study

Published
04 January 2011
By
Michael Carter
Belly fat puts women at risk for osteoporosis

(Radiological Society of North America) For years, it was believed that obese women were at lower risk for developing osteoporosis, and that excess body fat actually protected against bone loss. However, a new study found that having too much internal abdominal fat may, in fact, have a damaging effect on bone health.

Published
30 November 2010
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
The lesser known complications of HIV/AIDS

Levin urges all people with HIV to be assertive about discussing osteoporosis and other age-related conditions with their doctor.

Published
29 November 2010
From
Huffington Post
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Issues Guidelines on Care for HIV-Infected Women

The guidelines cover the recommended health screenings, counseling, and routine gynecologic care for women with HIV/AIDS.

Published
23 November 2010
From
Medscape

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.