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Insulin resistance is a big risk factor for the progression of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected people

Insulin resistance is associated with the progression of liver fibrosis in people co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C, Canadian researchers report in the online edition of AIDS.

Published
13 July 2012
By
Michael Carter
HIV and TB in Practice for nurses: non-communicable diseases, HIV and TB

Conditions such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes in low- and middle-income countries, and awareness of these conditions in people living with HIV and/or TB.

Published
18 May 2012
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
Reductions in visceral fat during tesamorelin therapy associated with improvements in key metabolic markers

Reductions in visceral adiposity achieved with tesamorelin therapy are associated with improvements in some key metabolic parameters, according to a study published in the online edition of

Published
30 April 2012
By
Michael Carter
NHS 'wastes billions on diabetes'

The bulk of the £9.8bn the NHS spends on diabetes each year is wasted - and the disease could cost it a sixth of its entire budget by 2035, says a report.

Published
25 April 2012
From
BBC Health
HIV Exacerbates Heart Risk from Hypertension

Elevated blood pressure may warrant more aggressive management in HIV-positive individuals, suggest results from a cohort study reported at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

Published
22 March 2012
From
Family Practice News Digital Network
Why are children missing from WHO targets on non-infectious diseases?

Children die from cancer, heart disease and other non-infectious illnesses but they are in danger of being forgotten as global targets for action are drawn up, say health groups

Published
20 March 2012
From
The Guardian
Metformin reduces artery plaque in HIV-positive people with metabolic syndrome

The diabetes drug metformin can help stall progression of calcium buildup in the coronary arteries of HIV-positive people with metabolic abnormalities, potentially reducing their risk of cardiovascular events,

Published
14 March 2012
By
Liz Highleyman
Diabetes drug halts atherosclerosis progression in HIV-infected patients

Treatment with the common diabetes drug metformin appears to prevent progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients infected with HIV.

Published
08 March 2012
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Fat accumulation linked to cognitive impairment in patients with HIV

Central fat accumulation is associated with an increased risk of neurocognitive impairment for HIV-positive patients, according to a study published in the February edition of Neurology. Overall 40%

Published
24 February 2012
By
Michael Carter
HIV Is 'Like Diabetes'? Let's Stop Kidding Ourselves

My antenna perked up when I read a gay man's comment that HIV infection is essentially no big deal anymore. "It's like diabetes these days," he said. As an HIV-positive 53-year-old, familiar with the health details of some near and dear diabetics, I'd say this: we need to choose our analogies carefully.

Published
31 January 2012
From
Huffington Post

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.