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The UN's Battle With NCDs

How Politics, Commerce, and Science Complicated the Fight Against an 'Invisible Epidemic' .

Published
20 September 2011
From
Foreign Affairs
As U.N. Meets, A Battle Over Generic Biotech Drugs

A U.N. summit on non-communicable diseases, which now account for two-thirds of global deaths, is being overshadowed by conflict between the United States and developing nations regrading access to generic versions of drugs to treat cancer and diabetes, the New York Times reports.

Published
20 September 2011
From
New York Times
Global fight against non-communicable diseases should take lessons from HIV-AIDS

Valuable lessons from the global commitment to fight HIV/AIDS over the past three decades should inspire a new worldwide effort to confront the epidemic of non-communicable diseases, say Emory public health leaders.

Published
07 September 2011
From
Moreover.com HIV/AIDS feed
Only four US state AIDS Drug Assistance Programmes cover all recommended cardiovascular risk-reduction therapies

The provision of medication to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by AIDS Drug Assistance Programs in the US is patchy and inconsistent, research published in the

Published
31 August 2011
By
Michael Carter
Type 2 diabetes in newly diagnosed 'can be reversed'

An extreme eight-week diet of 600 calories a day can reverse Type 2 diabetes in people newly diagnosed with the disease, says a Diabetologia study.

Published
24 June 2011
From
BBC
American Heart Association launches HIV-focused heart website

he American Heart Association and American Academy of HIV Medicine (AAHIVM) have created hivandyourheart.orgto help people living with HIV make changes to improve their heart health and overall wellness.  

Published
04 May 2011
From
Pharmalive
Why isn't there a global movement to combat noncommunicable diseases?

In Moscow on Thursday, health ministers from around the world gathered to discuss a serious global health crisis: the rise of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) like heart disease, stroke, depression, and cancer. Their goal is to replicate the successes of a similar meeting held nearly a decade ago, when the United Nations General Assembly convened a special session to combat HIV/AIDS.

Published
29 April 2011
From
New Republic
Heart failure more common in people with HIV

People with uncontrolled HIV infection are significantly more likely to suffer heart failure than people without HIV infection, according to results of a large cohort study of

Published
27 April 2011
By
Keith Alcorn
Room for improvement in quality of diabetes care provided to US veterans with HIV: lessons for HIV care providers

The quality of diabetes care provided to HIV-positive patients is good, but there is room for improvement, investigators from the US Department of Veteran’s Affairs report in

Published
25 April 2011
By
Michael Carter
Canadians find some ARVs increase risk of heart attack, but urge caution and stress need for context

The anti-HIV drugs abacavir, efavirenz, lopinavir, and ritonavir are all associated with an increased risk of heart attack in a Canadian study published in the online edition

Published
20 April 2011
By
Michael Carter

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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