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Kidney problems news

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Could HIV-infected organs save lives?

If Congress reversed its ban on allowing people with HIV to be organ donors after their death, roughly 500 HIV-positive patients with kidney or liver failure each year could get transplants within months, rather than the years they currently wait on the list, new Johns Hopkins research suggests.

Published
30 March 2011
From
Eurekalert HIV
Managing kidney disease in people living with HIV

Part of a series on kidney disease in resource-limited settings. This edition looks at assessment and management of kidney disease in people with HIV.

Published
11 February 2011
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
Acute and chronic kidney disease

Part of a series on kidney disease in resource-limited settings. This edition looks at the causes and prevalence of acute and chronic kidney disease in

Published
04 February 2011
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
Kidney disease in people with HIV: a clinical review (part one)

First in a series on kidney disease in resource-limited settings. This edition covers the scale of the problem, diagnosing kidney disease and monitoring kidney function.

Published
27 January 2011
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
Kidney transplant 'feasible' for patients with HIV

Kidney transplant is a feasible option for HIV-positive patients with end-stage renal disease, US investigators report in the November 18th edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. Three

Published
19 November 2010
By
Michael Carter
HIV and the kidneys

It’s becoming increasingly clear that, when it comes to HIV, amongst the most vulnerable organs in the body are those two little waste filters in the small

Published
01 November 2010
From
HIV treatment update
Low prevalence of end-stage kidney disease in European HIV patients

The prevalence of end-stage renal disease among HIV-positive patients in Europe is low, investigators report in an advance online publication in the Journal of Acquired Immune

Published
15 September 2010
By
Michael Carter
Aging With Complex Chronic Disease: The Wrinkled Face of AIDS

People living with HIV taking combination Antiretroviral Therapy (treatment) are living long enough to experience a diverse array of aging related conditions such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), renal disease, liver cirrhosis, and cancer.

Published
25 August 2010
From
The Body Pro / GMHC Treatment Issues
Tenofovir treatment impairs kidney function, but clinical significance limited

Treatment with tenofovir has an adverse impact on kidney function, but the clinical significance of this is modest, according to the results of a systematic review and

Published
16 August 2010
By
Michael Carter
Preventing HIV-Associated Nephropathy

Dr. Pravin C. Singal and colleagues at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY; the Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas; and New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY have identified mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a therapeutic target for HIV-associated nephropathy.

Published
30 July 2010
From
Science Daily

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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