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HIV patients in care lose more years of life to smoking than to HIV infection

Among HIV patients receiving well-organized care with free access to antiretroviral therapy, those who smoke lose more years of life to smoking than to HIV, according to a Danish study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online.

Published
21 December 2012
From
EurekAlert
Traditional risk factors strongest predictors of sub-clinical cardiovascular disease in people about to start HIV therapy

Sub-clinical cardiovascular disease in people with HIV is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for heart disease rather than inflammation or HIV-related parameters, US research

Published
17 December 2012
By
Michael Carter
Smoking the biggest single risk factor for acute heart disease in people with HIV

Smoking is the single biggest risk factor for acute coronary syndrome in HIV-positive adults, Spanish researchers report in the online edition of HIV Medicine. Smoking was a

Published
19 November 2012
By
Michael Carter
Obesity is a risk factor for co-occuring chronic health problems in patients with HIV

Obesity is associated with the clustering of multiple health problems in HIV-positive people, investigators from the US report in the online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune

Published
10 October 2012
By
Michael Carter
HIV is an independent risk factor for lung cancer

Infection with HIV is an independent risk factor for lung cancer, according to the results of a large US study published in the online edition of AIDS.

Published
03 April 2012
By
Michael Carter
Cancers in people with HIV: who gets them, and which ones?

A very low CD4 count in the past, and a history of smoking, are the most consistent risk factors to emerge from large studies of risks

Published
12 March 2012
By
Keith Alcorn
Smoking cessation counselling and treatment during routine HIV care helps patients to quit

The provision of smoking cessation counselling and therapy during routine HIV care increases the chances that patients will stop smoking and stay stopped, according to Swiss research published

Published
24 January 2012
By
Michael Carter
Smoking, not immunodeficiency or lung disease, increases lung cancer risk for patients with HIV

Cigarette smoking is the single most important risk factor for lung cancer in patients with HIV, Swiss investigators report in the online edition of the British Journal

Published
17 January 2012
By
Michael Carter
HIV Infection Not Associated With Lung Cancer

Higher lung cancer rates have been reported in people with HIV/AIDS than in the general population, but it has not been clear why.

Published
18 November 2011
From
Medscape (requires free registration)
Lung cancer is biggest killer in study of non-AIDS-defining cancers

A large cohort study of non-AIDS-defining cancers in people with HIV has found that while lung cancer was responsible for 16% of cases of these cancers it

Published
22 October 2011
By
Gus Cairns

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.