Search through all our worldwide HIV and AIDS news and features, using the topics below to filter your results by subjects including HIV treatment, transmission and prevention, and hepatitis and TB co-infections.

Task shifting news

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HIV and TB in Practice for nurses: TB symptom screening and linking to diagnosis and care

This edition looks at the practicalities of symptom screening and keeping track of patients during the diagnostic process.

Published
16 July 2012
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
HIV and TB in Practice for nurses: active TB case finding

The role of nurses and community health workers in the identification of TB in people living with HIV and in the wider community.

Published
09 July 2012
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
HIV and TB in Practice for nurses: cotrimoxazole prophylaxis

Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis is the use of a common antiobiotic to prevent a range of infections that commonly affect people living with HIV.

Published
23 June 2012
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
HIV and TB in Practice for nurses: non-communicable diseases, HIV and TB

Conditions such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes in low- and middle-income countries, and awareness of these conditions in people living with HIV and/or TB.

Published
18 May 2012
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
HIV and TB in Practice for nurses: integration and decentralisation

The drive towards decentralisation and integration of HIV services from the point of view of those delivering those services, nurses and community health workers.

Published
17 April 2012
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
Improved health, wish for normal life, main reason for loss to follow-up in Ugandan HIV patients

Wanting to return to a ‘normal’ life after having experienced an improvement in health on HIV treatment was the key reason for loss to follow-up of three-quarters

Published
17 April 2012
By
Carole Leach-Lemens
HIV and TB in Practice for nurses

This is the first of a special monthly edition of HATiP for nurses and other health care workers involved in task-shifting in sub-Saharan Africa.

Published
03 February 2012
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
The Manchester Malawian medic myth

Are there more doctors from Malawi in the British city of Manchester than there are in Malawi itself? Many people have made this claim - including the authors of an international study of health workers, and the head of Malawi's main nursing union.

Published
15 January 2012
From
BBC Health
Task shifting for male medical circumcision safe: international review

With proper training and supervision task shifting of medical male circumcision to non-physician clinicians in Africa can be done safely, according to researchers in South Africa and North

Published
06 January 2012
By
Carole Leach-Lemens
Agnes Binagwahois: Male circumcision and the path to an AIDS-free generation

Whereas a surgical circumcision can take 20 minutes per patient, the PrePex non-surgical device reduces procedure time to 3 minutes, meaning we can circumcise more men faster and without compromising their safety or the device’s effectiveness.

Published
13 December 2011
From
Washington Post

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.