Search through all our worldwide HIV and AIDS news and features, using the topics below to filter your results by subjects including HIV treatment, transmission and prevention, and hepatitis and TB co-infections.

Treatment outcomes and life expectancy news

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Expanding coverage of HIV therapy is highly cost-effective, and could prevent many new infections

Increasing the proportion of HIV-positive patients treated with antiretroviral therapy could save the Canadian province of British Columbia US$900 million over 30 years - and

Published
08 July 2010
By
Michael Carter
Kidney disease increases mortality for women with AIDS starting HIV treatment

Poor kidney function at the time HIV treatment is started is associated with an increased risk of death, a study conducted amongst US women and

Published
08 July 2010
By
Michael Carter
Inflammation associated with increased mortality risk for patients with HIV, even when CD4 cell count high

High levels of two markers of inflammation – fibrinogen and C-reactive protein – are independently associated with an increased risk of mortality for patients with

Published
06 July 2010
By
Michael Carter
Cotrimoxazole cuts mortality for symptomatic patients with HIV in areas with low malaria prevalence

Starting treatment with the antibiotic cotrimoxazole at the same time as antiretroviral therapy reduces mortality by over a third amongst patients with HIV, South African

Published
06 July 2010
By
Michael Carter
Good early increases in CD4 count reduce mortality risk for malnourished HIV patients

Robust early increases in CD4 cell count reduce the risk of death for patients with HIV, even those who are severely malnourished, investigators from Zambia

Published
05 July 2010
By
Michael Carter
Viral load increases in cells predicts CD4 cell decline in asymptomatic patients

Viral load increases steadily in cells during the asymptomatic stage of HIV infection, and is an accurate marker of disease progression, Dutch investigators report in

Published
01 July 2010
By
Michael Carter
'Encouraging' long-term outcomes for French children infected with HIV at birth

The outcomes for children who were infected with HIV at birth before 1993 in France are “encouraging”, investigators report in the July 15th edition of

Published
29 June 2010
By
Michael Carter
AIDS-related deaths continue to fall, diseases of ageing and lifestyle on the rise in people with HIV

Lifestyle and social factors need to be addressed if the full potential of HIV treatment to lower mortality is to be realised, according to results

Published
28 April 2010
By
Michael Carter
HIV subtype affects risk of brain impairment in HIV-positive children

HIV subtype A is associated with poorer neuropsychological performance than subtype D in children, investigators from Uganda report in the online edition of AIDS. Children

Published
14 April 2010
By
Michael Carter
Lymphomas amongst patients with HIV in South Africa described for first time

Investigators in Johannesburg have found that the majority of certain lymphomas diagnosed in the city are in people with HIV. Their findings, which are published

Published
14 April 2010
By
Michael Carter

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.